Washington State enters Phase 3 on March 22

Press Release from the Washington state Governors Office

Gov. Jay Inslee today announced that Healthy Washington: Roadmap to Recovery will be transitioning from a regional approach to a county-by-county evaluation process. The governor also announced a new third phase of the Roadmap and a return for in-person spectators for professional and high school sports.

Effective March 22, the entire state will enter Phase 3.

Included here: stadiums—professional—higher education—and K-12 schools, ballparks, motorsports
racetracks, rodeos and similar venues.

Effective March 22, the entire state will enter Phase 3.
Gov. Jay Inslee announced that Healthy Washington: Roadmap to Recovery will be transitioning from a regional approach to a county-by-county evaluation process. The governor also announced a new third phase of the Roadmap and a return for in-person spectators for professional and high school sports.

Phase 3:

  • Individual designated seating capability. Open, unreserved seating not allowed.
  • Controlled entrances and exits, ability to monitor exact attendance.

An outdoor venue that meets those requirements may:

  • Open to a capacity of 25% per section or 9,000 spectators maximum, whichever is lower.
  • For smaller facilities up to 400 spectators maximum allowed at 50% capacity. over 400 spectators at 25% capacity and capacity must not exceed 9,000 spectators total.

On April 15, 2021, conditions will be re-evaluated.
Additional venue requirements:

  • Each facility must have a plan for handling congestion and reducing crowding, including entrance and exits, parking facilities, stairs and elevators, and any areas where lines form.
  • Facility staff will monitor the execution of the plan.
  • Tickets must be sold in groups of 1-8. Each group of 1-8 spectators must be 6 feet away (side-toside and front-to-back) from other groups of 1-8. Groups of 1-8 spectators should come from no more than two different households.
  • Facilities with benches, bleachers or non-numbered seating must block off a portion of seating to ensure groups are distanced.
  • Suites or other indoor viewing areas, including dine-in food service areas, limited to 25% capacity and windows are required to be open at all times.
  • Outdoor viewing areas without permanent seating are limited to one seated group (1-6 people) per 100 square ft.
  • Each group will be in a reserved space, only available to the group or pod who purchased a specific location.
  • Groups of 1-6 should come from no more than two different households.
  • Facility staff must monitor and restrict interactions between groups.
  • Each outdoor viewing area limited to a maximum of 100
  • spectators.
  • Outdoor viewing areas without reserved seating only allowed if they are a part of a facility that has individual designated seating capability and controlled entrances and exits.
  • Spectators in these areas count towards the total allowed maximum of 9,000 spectators.
  • Bleachers are not considered “outdoor viewing areas” and must be limited to 25% capacity.
  • Retail shops subject to current guidelines for in-store retail.
  • Removal of masks and facial coverings only allowed while actively eating or drinking in assigned seating.
  • Lines for food and beverages must be marked to ensure 6 feet a distance between each person waiting in line.
  • Lines for restrooms must be marked to ensure 6 feet a distance between each person waiting in line. All restrooms should be open to increase dispersion of users among restrooms facilities.
  • Lines may not extend out into designated walkways in a way that impedes the flow and/or compromises the ability to appropriately physically distance in those designated walkways

*Not included here: indoor arenas, indoor sports facilities, street fairs, park venues or other outdoor
venues without permanent seating and similar venues.

Metrics

Under the updated plan, counties will be individually evaluated every three weeks. The evaluations will occur on Mondays with any possible changes taking effect Friday, with the first evaluation scheduled for April 12.

In addition to being individually evaluated, large and small counties will have different sets of criteria. If any county fails one or more of the metrics below, that county will move down one Phase in the Heathy Washington plan.

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For large counties to remain in Phase 3, defined as counties with more than 50,000 residents, they must keep a 14-day average of new COVID cases at or below 200 per 100,000 residents, and a seven-day average of new hospitalizations per 100,000 at five or fewer.

Smaller counties, those with populations of 50,000 or less, must maintain a 14-day average of new cases at 30 or fewer, and a new seven-day hospitalization average at three or fewer.

If at any point the statewide ICU capacity reaches greater than 90%, all counties will move down one Phase. The Department of Health always maintains the ability to move a county forward or backward at their discretion.

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